WRITING CRAFT: CHASES AND ESCAPES by Rayne Hall


Does your novel-in-progress contain a scene where the heroine escapes from danger, with the villain chasing after her? Excellent. Readers love the these scenes.

Here are some techniques to make your escape scene exciting.

1. Point of View

Stay in deep Point of View. If possible, write the scene from the fleeing person’s point of view. This means showing only what this person sees, hears and feels. If the PoV Continue reading

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Harmony and Discord by Amy Glamos


It was the wind that woke her, howling through the screens and lashing against the old house mercilessly.  The lone tree that graced their backyard scraped across the roof with its gnarled, naked limbs, refusing to relent.  Mariah turned to the glowing numbers on the alarm clock.  4:23.  Her eyes went to her husband, soundlessly sprawled on the pillow next to her.  The stark black ink of a tattoo peeking out from beneath the sheets called forth bygone nights that felt scattered by a wind just as strong as the one raging outside.  Her Continue reading

The Use of Alliteration by Rayne Hall


Alliteration 

Several words close together starting with the same sound, can either empower your writing or spoil it, so use this technique with thought.

Here are some examples of skilfully applied alliterations from famous books:

 

–the foam-flakes flew over her bulwarks…. (Moby-Dick by Herman Melville)RayneHall - Fantasy Horror Author - Portrait by Fawnheart

–the baked red ruts of the road…. (The Beaver Road by Dave Duncan)

–A sliver of soft sunlight pierced a crack in the silk drapes (Panic by Jeff Abbot) Continue reading

Reminder: Accepting Applications for Showcase


Reminder

We are still forming the panel to be featured in our first Select Showcase: We are looking for five skilled writers to address the same theme in different ways.

The five chosen pieces will be featured in a Showcase that will be open for public display, as well as inviting professionals from the publishing world to come and view.

If you are ready to write “Published” quality work in 2,000 to 4,000 words, using the theme of FIRST LOVE, Continue reading

What To Expect From A Critique & Book Reviews


bae910b9-d3a9-482f-affe-8395e4f97ec3What is a critique?

Critique is a of disciplined, systematic analysis of a written or oral discourse. Critique is commonly understood as fault-finding and negative judgement, but it can also involve merit recognition, and in the philosophical tradition it also means a methodical practice of doubt. —Babylon dictionary.

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My little ranting…

Ever since I saw someone throw a fit about reviews they received by a reader, I’ve been dying to write about it.  So that I may stop banging my head against my desk when reading about this oh-so-common problem, I am going to vent here. Continue reading

The Dangers of Writing In Passive When an Active Voice Is Demanded.


This post is aimed towards genres such as  horror, thriller, suspense and action ( pretty much any genre where the need to grip the audience’s attention is necessary!)

Keep in mind, while reading this post, I am not expert writer. However, I have had more than my share of rough critiques, and I’m grateful for them. Without them I would not have been sought after by publicists for Nadia, and commended on my vigorous technique. My hope in writing this post is to help some of you learn a bit of what I’ve learned. 

Write in an active voice!! Do not attempt to write these genre’s in a passive voice. It will not sit well with your audience. We choose to read these genres with an expectation that we will be blown away, not put to sleep. Continue reading